In Solidarity

As visibly non-Black or lighter skin people of color, we recognize that we benefit unearned privileges that are robbed from visibly Black people everyday. This collection contains resources that support non-Black or lighter skinned people of color in working together to interrogate, interrupt and abolish policies, behaviors, and ideas that promote anti-blackness to move towards anti-racist policies, behaviors, ideas, anti-oppression.

Consider these resources to support professional learning on racism and civic education.

Included Resources

As visibly Non-Black or Lighter Skin People of Color, we recognize that we benefit unearned privileges that are robbed from visibly Black people everyday. We must work together to interrogate, interrupt and abolish policies, behaviors, and ideas that promote anti-blackness to move towards anti-racist policies, behaviors, ideas, anti-oppression. We know that our own struggles for freedom and liberation have been deeply influenced by Black American struggles that preceded us. Black communities have paid dearly for resisting their own oppression, and in doing so, they have also paved the way for our resistances. Let's not burden our Black people with our gaps in knowledge, skills, cultural, and consciousness. While it can be beneficial to hear someone else's perspective its more powerful when you get clarity on your own. You must unpack your relationship and history with Blackness. Let's do the self-work to show up and show out!

Click here for an accessible version of this resource.

Consider this resource to support professional learning on racism and civic education.

In this episode of In Solidarity, Narcisa, Ilianette, Celida, and Elena - four visibly non-Black or lighter skin women of color from NYCDOE - talk about what it looks like to take action to show solidarity (1:21-23:55), how they celebrate Black lives and honor Black people (23:56-33:09), and share their personal stories as they examine oppression, privilege, and connections between their communities of color and the Black community (33:28-43:56).

For an accessible transcript of this audio recording, click here.