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Framework for Teaching professional learning resources

The resources in this collection support administrators and teachers in using the Framework for Teaching as a tool to enhance teachers' professional practice. 

Included Resources

The Danielson 2013 Framework for Teaching is the rubric used as a formative tool for teacher development as well as for evaluating teacher practice. This set of Professional Learning Activities inlcudes six 30-minute sessions aimed at building teachers’ and school leaders’ familiarity with the Framework for Teaching. Please see the document titled ...

In this professional learning activity, which can be modified to fit either one 60-minute session or two 45-minute sessions, participants will look closely at the relationship between any two chosen components of the Danielson Framework for Teaching (e.g., 2a and 2d; 3a and 3c; 3b and 3d).

The Danielson 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) is the rubric used for teacher development and observation/evaluation. It is used as a formative tool to develop teacher practice as well as a rubric for use when observing and evaluating teacher practice. This version of the rubric contains all 22 components across four domains.

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This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Frameowork for Teaching (FfT) component 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 1a Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Frameowork for Teaching (FfT) component 1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 1c Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 1eInstructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 2a Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 2d: Managing Student Behavior. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 2d Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 3a: Communicating with Students. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 3a Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 3b Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 3c: Engaging Students in Learning. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 3c Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Framework for Teaching (FfT) component 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 3d Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

This resource supports teachers and school leaders with identifying next steps for a priority area connected to Danielson's Frameowork for Teaching (FfT) component 4e: Growing and Developing Professionally. It includes component-specific "ask abouts" which focus on each of the component's elements, and which can be used to support professional conversations such as (but not limited to) pre-observation conferences, post-observation conferences, and feedback conversations. It also includes a 4e Instructional Next Steps Idea Bank and a set of questions that teachers and school leaders can use frame their collaborative discussion around identifying, implementing, and evaluating next steps.

In this 35-45 minute professional learning activity, participants explore different ways to use the Specific Considerations resources and identify strategies to strengthen teacher practice and improve student outcomes for educators working with ELLs, Students with Disabilities, and in the Arts.

This template supports teachers in applying the component focus questions in the Specific Considerations documents when reflecting on their instructional practice. This tool can be used with the Specific Considerations for Teachers of Students with Disabilities, Specific Considerations for Teachers of English Language Learners documents as well as the Specific Considerations for Teachers of Dance, Music, Theater, and Visual Arts documents.

New York State’s Education Law 3012-d requires that lead evaluators have appropriate guidance regarding specific considerations in evaluating teachers of English Language Learners (ELLs). Also, many school leaders and teachers have requested additional support in using Danielson's 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) rubric in classrooms in which student characteristics, subject content, or program models may differ significantly from other courses or subjects. In response, this document offers specific considerations for school leaders and teachers of ELLs through component-aligned questions (for each of the Framework's 22 components). These questions may be discussed when providing feedback, engaging in pre- and post-observations, and planning next steps; they are not to be used for evaluating teacher practice. In addition, these questions can be used by teachers voluntarily as a resource to guide their thinking as they plan and reflect on their instructional practice in how they are meeting the needs of ELLs.

New York State’s Education Law 3012-d requires that lead evaluators have appropriate guidance regarding specific considerations in evaluating teachers of students with disabilities (SWDs). Also, many school leaders and teachers have requested additional support in using Danielson's 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) rubric in classrooms in which student characteristics, subject content, or program models may differ significantly from other courses or subjects. In response, this document offers specific considerations for school leaders and teachers of students with disabilities through component-aligned questions (For each of the Framework's 22 components). These questions may be discussed when providing feedback, engaging in pre- and post-observations, and planning next steps; they are not to be used for evaluating teacher practice. In addition, these questions can be used by teachers voluntarily as a resource to guide their thinking as they plan

Danielson’s 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) was created as an overarching framework that describes the commonalities in every classroom—those aspects of teaching that are common across grades, disciplines, and students’ backgrounds. Thus, the FfT is appropriate for use with and by teachers of the arts. Many school leaders and teachers have requested additional support in using the FfT in classrooms in which student characteristics, subject content, or program models may differ significantly from other courses or subjects. In response, this document offers specific considerations for school leaders and dance teachers through component-aligned questions. These questions may be discussed when providing feedback, engaging in pre- and post-observations, and planning next steps; they are not to be used for evaluating teacher practice. In addition, these questions can be used by teachers voluntarily as a resource to guide their thinking as they plan and reflect on their instructional practice in how they are meeting the needs of their students.

Danielson’s 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) was created as an overarching framework that describes the commonalities in every classroom—those aspects of teaching that are common across grades, disciplines, and students’ backgrounds. Thus, the FfT is appropriate for use with and by teachers of the arts. Many school leaders and teachers have requested additional support in using the FfT in classrooms in which student characteristics, subject content, or program models may differ significantly from other courses or subjects. In response, this document offers specific considerations for school leaders and theater teachers through component-aligned questions. These questions may be discussed when providing feedback, engaging in pre- and post-observations, and planning next steps; they are not to be used for evaluating teacher practice. In addition, these questions can be used by teachers voluntarily as a resource to guide their thinking as they plan and reflect on their instructional practice in how they are meeting the needs of their students.

Danielson’s 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) was created as an overarching framework that describes the commonalities in every classroom—those aspects of teaching that are common across grades, disciplines, and students’ backgrounds. Thus, the FfT is appropriate for use with and by teachers of the arts. Many school leaders and teachers have requested additional support in using the FfT in classrooms in which student characteristics, subject content, or program models may differ significantly from other courses or subjects. In response, this document offers specific considerations for school leaders and visual arts teachers through component-aligned questions. These questions may be discussed when providing feedback, engaging in pre- and post-observations, and planning next steps; they are not to be used for evaluating teacher practice. In addition, these questions can be used by teachers voluntarily as a resource to guide their thinking as they plan and reflect on their instructional practice in how they are meeting the needs of their students.

Danielson’s 2013 Framework for Teaching (FfT) was created as an overarching framework that describes the commonalities in every classroom—those aspects of teaching that are common across grades, disciplines, and students’ backgrounds. Thus, the FfT is appropriate for use with and by teachers of the arts. Many school leaders and teachers have requested additional support in using the FfT in classrooms in which student characteristics, subject content, or program models may differ significantly from other courses or subjects. In response, this document offers specific considerations for school leaders and music teachers through component-aligned questions. These questions may be discussed when providing feedback, engaging in pre- and post-observations, and planning next steps; they are not to be used for evaluating teacher practice. In addition, these questions can be used by teachers voluntarily as a resource to guide their thinking as they plan and reflect on their instructional practice in how they are meeting the needs of their students.

This protocol is a tool for exploring any of the 2013 Danielson Framework for Teaching's 22 components in detail. It can be used by groups of teachers or school teams as a professional learning activity clarify and deepen thinking about the Framework for Teaching (FfT) components, connect the Framework to the school’s work, and support educators in considering the components within their own contexts. This activity can be used to jigsaw components among a school community or be used over time with a team to examine components as an ongoing professional learning activity.

This protocol can be used by groups administrators and/or teachers to support them in fairly and accurately interpreting teacher practice, thus bringing greater objectivity to teacher development and evaluation.

Standards:
Danielson Framework for Teaching 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and PedagogyDanielson Framework for Teaching 1c: Setting Instructional OutcomesDanielson Framework for Teaching 1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of ResourcesDanielson Framework for Teaching 1e: Designing Coherent InstructionDanielson Framework for Teaching 1f: Designing Student AssessmentsDanielson Framework for Teaching 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and RapportDanielson Framework for Teaching 2b: Establishing a Culture for LearningDanielson Framework for Teaching 2c: Managing Classroom ProceduresDanielson Framework for Teaching 2d: Managing Student BehaviorDanielson Framework for Teaching 2e: Organizing Physical SpaceDanielson Framework for Teaching 3a: Communicating with StudentsDanielson Framework for Teaching 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion TechniqueDanielson Framework for Teaching 3c: Engaging Students in LearningDanielson Framework for Teaching 3d: Using Assessment in InstructionDanielson Framework for Teaching 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and ResponsivenessQuality Review Indicators 4.1 Teacher Support and SupervisionDanielson Framework for Teaching 4a: Reflecting on TeachingDanielson Framework for Teaching 4b: Maintaining Accurate RecordsDanielson Framework for Teaching 4c: Communicating with FamiliesDanielson Framework for Teaching 4d: Participating in the Professional CommunityDanielson Framework for Teaching 4e: Growing and Developing ProfessionallyDanielson Framework for Teaching 4f: Showing Professionalism
Educational Use: