Black citizenship in the age of Jim Crow

These curriculum materials, produced in connection with the New-York Historical Society’s 2018 exhibition Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow, explore the contested efforts toward full citizenship and racial equality for African Americans in the fifty years after the Civil War. The period between the end of slavery in 1865 and the end of World War I in 1919 saw African Americans champion their rights as the “separate but equal” age of Jim Crow began. Examining both the activism for and opposition to black citizenship rights, this curriculum underscores how ideas of freedom and citizenship were redefined by government and citizen action, and challenged by legal discrimination and violence.

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This overview of the "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow" - a curriculum produced in connection with the New-York Historical Society's 2018 exhibition provides a summary of resources available in the curriculum, New York State and Next Generation Standards alignment, and suggested activities to use the curriculum with.

These curriculum materials, produced in connection with the New-York Historical Society’s 2018 exhibition Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow, explore the contested efforts toward full citizenship and racial equality for African Americans in the fifty years after the Civil War. The period between the end of slavery in 1865 and the end of World War I in 1919 saw African Americans champion their rights as the “separate but equal” age of Jim Crow began. Examining both the activism for and opposition to black citizenship rights, this curriculum underscores how ideas of freedom and citizenship were redefined by government and citizen action, and challenged by legal discrimination and violence.

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